Population Based Haematological Reference Ranges for Adults in Nigeria: An Update

Clinton Ezema

Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, Enugu, Nigeria.

Tilako B. Halilu

Directorate of Medical Laboratory Services, State Ministry of Health Gombe State, Nigeria.

Amaechi I. Mba

Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, Enugu, Nigeria.

Rahila Amon

Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory, State Specialist Hospital Gombe, Gombe State, Nigeria.

Nonyelum V. Anoh

Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Enugu State University of Science and Technology College of Medicine, Parklane, Enugu, Nigeria.

Ada J. Chineke

Enugu State University of Science and Technology Teaching Hospital, College of Medicine, Parklane, Enugu, Nigeria.

Eyiuche D. Ezigbo *

Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, Enugu, Nigeria.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Background: Over the past few decades, the results of laboratory testing have undergone tremendous modification. This is as a result of technology advancements that have improved diagnostic methodology.

Aim: The overarching goal of this study was to provide an update on the adult population of Nigeria's haematological profile while taking into account characteristics that had not been addressed in earlier publications. Materials and Methods: A total of 965 healthy adults participated in this cross-sectional study. They came from Calabar in Cross River State, Gombe State in northeastern Nigeria, and Enugu State in southeast Nigeria. Five millilitres (5 ml) of blood were drawn and well mixed in an EDTA anticoagulant bottle. Using the haematology auto analyzer BC5300 Mindray, the full blood count was carried out on the entire sample of blood. For serological testing, samples were spurned and their plasma was collected after centrifugation. Individuals were excluded from further research if they tested positive for HIV, HBsAg, malaria parasites, or a positive pregnancy test. Participants provided written informed consent for the collection of samples and their ensuing analysis, and the study was authorized by the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu, ethical committee.

Results: The mean value for RDW-CV in adult Nigerians was 13.7, RDW-SD (fl) was 52.74, MPV (fl) was 10.29, PDW was 16.13 and the PCT (mL/L) was 2.20. The platelets showed variations across the ethnic groups, for instance, Efik ethnic group had the lowest value (188±61.6) while the Yoruba population had the highest value (246±77.7) when compared with the population put together (216.84).

Conclusion: The mean value for RDW-CV, RDW-SD, MPV, PDW and PCT, were captured in this study but we did not record any ethnic or sex variation for them.

Keywords: Hematological profiles, red cell distribution width, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and plateletocrit


How to Cite

Ezema , C., Halilu , T. B., Mba , A. I., Amon , R., V. Anoh , N., Chineke , A. J., & Ezigbo , E. D. (2023). Population Based Haematological Reference Ranges for Adults in Nigeria: An Update . International Journal of Research and Reports in Hematology, 6(2), 136–143. Retrieved from https://journalijr2h.com/index.php/IJR2H/article/view/115

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Kaito K, Otsubo H, Usui N, Yoshida M, Tanno J, Kurihara E, Matsumoto K, Hirata R, Domitsu K, Kobayashi M. Platelet size deviation width, platelet large cell ratio, and mean platelet volume have sufficient sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenia. Br. J. Haematol. 2005;128:698–702. Available:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2141.2004.05357.x

Eicher JD, Lettre G, Johnson AD. The genetics of platelet count and volume in humans. Platelets. 2018;29:125–130. Available:https://doi.org/10.1080/09537104.2017.1317732

Dacie JV, Lewis SM. Practical haematology, Eleventh, Churchill Livingstone., London; 2012.

Akpek M, Kaya MG, Yarlioglues M, Dogdu O, Ardic I, Sahin O, Elcik D, Ozdogru I, Topsakal R, Oguzhan A, Ergin A, Kalay N. Relationship between platelet indices and spontaneous echo contrast in patients with mitral stenosis. Eur. J. Echocardiogr. J. Work. Gr. Echocardiogr. Eur. Soc. Cardiol. 2011;12:865–870. Available:https://doi.org/10.1093/ejechocard/jer159

Bain BJ. Ethnic and sex differences in the total and differential white cell count and platelet count. J. Clin. Pathol. 1996; 49:664–666. Available:https://doi.org/10.1136/jcp.49.8.664

Biino G, Balduini CL, Casula L, Cavallo P, Vaccargiu S, Parracciani D, Serra D, Portas L, Murgia F, Pirastu M. Analysis of 12,517 inhabitants of a Sardinian geographic isolate reveals that predispositions to thrombocytopenia and thrombocytosis are inherited traits. Haematologica. 2011;96:96–101. Available:https://doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2010.029934

Biino G, Gasparini P, D’Adamo P, Ciullo M, Nutile T, et al. Influence of age, sex and ethnicity on platelet count in five Italian geographic isolates: Mild thrombocytopenia may be physiological. Br. J. Haematol. 2012;157:384–387. Available:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2141.2011.08981.x

Butkiewicz AM, Kemona H, Dymicka-Piekarska V, et al. Platelet count, mean platelet volume and thrombocytopoietic indices in healthy women and men. Thromb. Res. 2006;118:199–204. Available:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2005.06.021

Santimone I, Di Castelnuovo A, De Curtis A, Spinelli M, et al. White blood cell count, sex and age are major determinants of heterogeneity of platelet indices in an adult general population: Results from the MOLI-SANI project. Haematologica. 2011;96:1180–1188. Available:https://doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2011.043042

Buckley MF, James JW, Brown DE, Whyte GS, Dean MG, Chesterman CN, Donald JA. A novel approach to the assessment of variations in the human platelet count. Thromb. Haemost. 2000;83:480–484.

Nagata Y, Yoshikawa J, Hashimoto A, Yamamoto M, Payne AH, Todokoro K. Proplatelet formation of megakaryocytes is triggered by autocrine-synthesized estradiol. Genes Dev. 2003;17:2864–2869. Available:https://doi.org/10.1101/gad.1128003

Ayemoba O, Hussain N, Umar T, Ajemba-Life A, Kene T, Edom U, Ogueri I, et al. Establishment of reference values for selected haematological parameters in young adult Nigerians. Plos One. 2019;14:e0213925–e0213925. Available:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0213925.

Morley A. A platelet cycle in normal individuals. Australas. Ann. Med. 1969;18:127–129. Available:https://doi.org/10.1111/imj.1969.18.2.127.

Stevens RF, Alexander MK. A sex difference in the platelet count. Br. J. Haematol. 1977;37: 295–300. Available:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2141.1977.tb06847.x

Ayemoba O, Hussain N, Umar T, Ajemba-Life A, Kene T, Edom U, Ogueri I, Nwagbara G, Ochai I, Eneja C. Establishment of reference values for selected haematological parameters in young adult Nigerians. Plos One. 2019;14:1–9. Available:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0213925.

Ike SO, Nubila T, Ukaejiofo EO, Nubila IN, Shu EN, Ezema I. Comparison of haematological parameters determined by the Sysmex KX - 2IN automated haematology analyzer and the manual counts. BMC Clin. Pathol. 2010;10:3. Available:https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6890-10-3